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View Full Version : How much time gain is normal in 24 hours?


Yume-sama
5 January 2009, 06:02 PM
My Platinum DD gained about 15 seconds today, it could be the way I set it when I went to bed lastnight. What is the normal gain (or loss) in 24 hours?

I know you guys are the only people obsessed with precision enough to be able to answer this. :chuckle:

JJ Irani
5 January 2009, 06:08 PM
Any more than one second on any of my Rolex watches, and I turn ballistic!! :chuckle::chuckle:

Yume-sama
5 January 2009, 06:11 PM
Any more than one second on any of my Rolex watches, and I turn ballistic!! :chuckle::chuckle:

:dummy: So, do you reset the time everyday? :thinking:

JJ Irani
5 January 2009, 06:12 PM
:dummy: So, do you reset the time everyday? :thinking:

NO!!! That's just how accurate my 3 Rolex models are!! :read::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Cato
5 January 2009, 06:20 PM
My new DJ is running +6; I'm currently checking it again. -4 +6 is the Rolex standard. If I were you, I'd check it again and if it is still more than 6-8 seconds, send it back to Rolex for adjustment. Years ago when I got my first automatic watch, my SMP, it was running +10 minutes! Not knowing any better I sent it to the Omega Service center in NJ! That's the worse center in the Omega organization, I understand. Well about 4 months later it came back to me and was running +5. After it's last service it's running +1!

shedlock2000
5 January 2009, 06:25 PM
SCOC watches are recomended -4 +6 seconds per day. However, JJ is always correct, mostly Rolex watches gain or loose very little, and anything really over SCOC recomended alowance and your watch should be set by and AD to bring it back in to allowable limits.

On the other hand, my GMT IIc gains about 10seconds a day, whereas my GMT II gained only -4 +6 seconds a month.

the way that watches are adjusted can alow for small discrepancies in time keeping. One of JJs watches remained perfectly in time for several weeks before loosing even a second.

Time keeping may also have to do with your occupation, and how you place your watch at night, or how you set it in the first place. There has been some threads about wether to leave crown down, or up at night, or flat. This also can affect accuracy. For me, i wear mine through the night, so it moves as i do.

All this considered, i must say, and i feel many will agree, 15 seconds, is a little excessive, and, you should drop it in to an AD for adjustment.

Hope this helps!

Skutt50
5 January 2009, 08:57 PM
My recently serviced and "newly" regulated DateJust slows down about one second during the day and gains about the same during the night if I leave it crown up.

Certain days it may loose more depending on my level of activity. Over a months time I usually have the correct time within +5 to -20 seconds and I only need to set it when I adjust the days at the end of some months.

Shlomo
20 January 2009, 04:51 PM
What Rolex can give the most Accuracy?
I know that it depends from many factors. But, potencially, what movement can show the time more accurate?

Thanks!

pepemaui
20 January 2009, 04:57 PM
All of the diamonds make it faster.
:lol::lol::werd:

axpidn
20 January 2009, 06:15 PM
My seiko 7s26 first year around 12s/day now around 15s/day not bad for 120 usd watch....

vapalux
21 January 2009, 01:22 AM
Funny that. my 20+ year old Seiko 5 auto keeps perfect time. Not bad for 12 off ebay!

My Rolex's despite adjustment always run fast. No idea why I have just got used to it.

Si:cheers::cheers:

Moto
21 January 2009, 01:44 AM
I suggest that you fully wind the watch then place it in the same position for the next 24 hours to see what it does.

It would concern me if the accuracy of my watch changed suddenly and I would have it inspected immediately. I might even hack it if the change was significant.

vapalux
21 January 2009, 03:45 AM
Hi Moto

I have done that. Wound it up and walked away and left it. Power reserve ok but I have 2 Rolex's which for some unknown reason run faster than the others. They have been looked at and adjusted/regulated more times than I can think.

I have just got used to it know even though it does annoy me occasionally. (That's when they go back to be checked again!)

Thanks for the info

Si:cheers::cheers:

Moto
21 January 2009, 04:57 AM
I actually meant that advice for Yume, but it stands for anyone experiencing similar issues.

tphan
21 January 2009, 05:08 AM
my subdate was 30+ per day...that's why it's at Dallas RSC as we speak :chuckle:

rickyslam
21 January 2009, 05:11 AM
My sub was doing +17 secs a day. I turned it in to Beverly Hills RSC 2 saturdays ago. I feel so naked without it. I want it back already! Also my DJ does +5secs a day which is acceptable. I do with it can be better. But thats what a casio is for.

Wildwing
21 January 2009, 03:02 PM
Plus one second a day with my Datejust. And if I place it crown up for the night, it will be back to square the next day. No need to ever adjust it manually.

yeeg
21 January 2009, 03:06 PM
Whats the best way to test the accuracy of the watch?

mfer
21 January 2009, 03:32 PM
Wow. Only 15 sec!

Min gains almost 24 hrs. More like 23 hr 58 sec.









Sorry could resist being a smart a88. all my watches lose time, never gain. Must be the way I wear them.

My sub ALWAYS loses 2 secs a day (or gains 23hr58sec) and my GMT IIc varies between -2 to -1 sec a day.

NDT III
21 January 2009, 03:44 PM
Go to usno.org. Set your watch to their clock, make note of the date, check back at 10 day intervals (or some multiple thereof if you can stand to wait that long).

Z-Sub
21 January 2009, 03:53 PM
My black sub used to gain only 1 sec per day but nowadays it's been gaining about 6 sec daily.

Funny, I've sent the LV sub and my bluesy to RSC for adjustment since they all ran fast almost 8-9 sec daily and came back fine. now my third sub is doing the same.
so far my SD4000 keeps about perfect time. same movement but subs seem to be more vulnerable.:crying:

tecknik1
21 January 2009, 05:08 PM
My 1958 Air King/Explorer Super Precision runs 3-5 seconds a day fast , I think thats very respectable for a 50 yr old watch , I,m 46 and the watch does better!!!

rijowysock
21 January 2009, 05:11 PM
dont worry about it if its one day..

you should always average your timekeeping over 10 days or more

average if over/under 10seconds/day then needs adjustment.. if not.. then fine.

aleeboy
21 January 2009, 07:43 PM
Is it normal for watches to change their daily variation rates? My Explorer II went from losing 2 seconds a day to gaining less than a second to losing less than a second per day in a few months. My IWC Pilot Chrono went from perfect (I mean it was perfect) to minus 1 second per day two weeks ago - it was running at this rate since August.

What causes this?

Kokyuryoku
22 January 2009, 04:00 AM
Is it normal for watches to change their daily variation rates? My Explorer II went from losing 2 seconds a day to gaining less than a second to losing less than a second per day in a few months. My IWC Pilot Chrono went from perfect (I mean it was perfect) to minus 1 second per day two weeks ago - it was running at this rate since August.

What causes this?

:thinking: 

xjeeunitx
22 January 2009, 04:19 AM
When my watch is fully wound, it runs +5 seconds per day. When it's almost out of power, it loses -4 seconds a day. It all depends on how you regulate your watch.

Moto
22 January 2009, 04:44 AM
When my watch is fully wound, it runs +5 seconds per day. When it's almost out of power, it loses -4 seconds a day. It all depends on how you regulate your watch.

I think that's backwards. Watches tend to run faster as they lose power.

Paul B
22 January 2009, 04:53 AM
Is it normal for watches to change their daily variation rates? My Explorer II went from losing 2 seconds a day to gaining less than a second to losing less than a second per day in a few months. My IWC Pilot Chrono went from perfect (I mean it was perfect) to minus 1 second per day two weeks ago - it was running at this rate since August.

What causes this?
They are pure mechanical devices, tiny little amazingly precise machines. They are affected by temperature, humidity, internal wear, spring tension, orientation of the movement etc... The better the movement the less they are affected by all of the above.
The joy of owning mechanical watches, is in knowing the precision required of that tiny little machine to keep accurate time despite all of the variables. The better the movement, the more accurate, reliable, stable, rugged and long lasting the watch will be.

:cheers:

Paul

PS. My 1967 1016 (Explorer 1) runs at +4sec a day.

Moto
22 January 2009, 05:21 AM
Is it normal for watches to change their daily variation rates? My Explorer II went from losing 2 seconds a day to gaining less than a second to losing less than a second per day in a few months. My IWC Pilot Chrono went from perfect (I mean it was perfect) to minus 1 second per day two weeks ago - it was running at this rate since August.

What causes this?

The parts wear, and the lubrication in the movement changes slightly over time. This causes small variations in accuracy. What you describe is normal. I would only get very concerned if the watch fell completely out of spec, or if the accuracy changed suddenly. Sudden changes in the performance of any machine are a very bad sign.

newrolexman
22 January 2009, 09:52 AM
GMT ll C

was off -6 a day when new


had it regulated at RSC

for the past 8 months

less then - 1/2 second a day

sometimes in a month its perfect


i check it to the atomic clock weekly


amazing ,, its more accurate then any of my quartz watches.


d

Porsche
22 January 2009, 01:39 PM
Another GMTiic here...

I'm proud to say mine is 0.288 seconds slow per day (15 seconds slow measured over the last 2 months)

I can't complain about that...

timackerman
22 January 2009, 02:50 PM
My 14060M is +1sec/day

Connoisseur
22 January 2009, 03:09 PM
My Deep Sea has been spot on for over a month. Perfect. I check it against my cell phone time and it never ceases to amaze me. I wear it 2-3 days a week. Otherwise, it sits on a winder.

But my 3 month old PAM 233 with the original P.2002 in-house movement runs -30 secs/day! Every 8 days, I wind it and it's lost 3-4 minutes. (I usually check it against the DSSD since it's so accurate). The problem is, I can't see parting with it for service and I don't mind adjusting the time when winding the watch. But it is kind of annoying that my $14k watch is losing 30 seconds a day. :concerned

Sperry
22 January 2009, 11:47 PM
http://www.usno.navy.mil/

http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/simpletime.html

This clock is second faster than Apple's synchronized time [laptop computer].
However, I'm sure they would insist my computer's time is slightly off.
[try telling a physicist half a second is a minor discrepancy; they'll give you a
"quick" four day dissertation on what can happen, on a sub-atomic level, in half a second.

i2onnel
15 February 2009, 11:07 AM
Sometimes my watch runs 15 to 20 + seconds faster. I don't really mind it... I think it's the way I lay the watch down before I goto bed. I lay it on it's back.

Lion
15 February 2009, 11:27 AM
According to the COSC standard Rolex watches should be anywhere between -4 to +6 per day. My GMT-II runs +5 seconds/day and my Sub 14060M runs +1 second/day so I'm right where it's supposed to be. I'm very happy!!!

ijen0311
15 February 2009, 11:36 AM
My SD was +15 seconds last night.
Guess I'll monitor it more long-term and see....

RolexPete32
15 February 2009, 12:11 PM
My new Air-king is bang on. Runs the same as quartz. was gaining 30 sec a day and went off to rolex and is now as I said perfect and has been for several months. My Sub LV is running around 6 sec fast a day went to Rolex for fine tuning came back and is still running +6 sec a day fast.

(ps No need to school me!!! I know Mech watches cannot run as well as quartz however I swear my air-king does or at least is such a small difference I can not notice against my quartz watch)

Perdu
15 February 2009, 12:17 PM
I wouldn't measure the gain over one day. Use it as you normally would and look at how it performs over ten days.

LDLemu4U
15 February 2009, 12:42 PM
I have 5 Rolex automatics, date of manufacture ranges from 1981 (GMT Master RootBeer) to 2002 (GMT Master II Black Bezel). I keep them on a 4 watch winder (aside from what's on my wrist) 8 - 10 hrs. a day. I only adjust the time when I have to change the date (those are mos. without the 31st. day). I do not keep track of which watch but the most variance I've ever had was like 1 min and 23 sec. So my criteria right now for service is if anyone of them is 4 min +/- for a min of 30 days. So..they would have to run +/- 8 sec per day for the red flag for servicing. I do this as I believe that less tampering with the crown for time adjustments and the like is less wear on the mechanical parts of the watches.

yannis7777
15 February 2009, 06:48 PM
I think the COSC standard is around 5-6 secs a day maximum.

pdxrolex
21 February 2009, 01:27 PM
My GMT 16710 runs +2 but if left crown up at night +0

AstroBoy
22 February 2009, 04:55 AM
I don't know what you guys talking about, but my recent acquired BNIB TT Daytona is "dead on" after 2 weeks since I wear it! I synced it with my iPhone clock apps that show tenth of a second. I just checked it the fourth time today and it's still dead on! Should I be worried? I'm a bit scare now! I have an abnormal watch? Is it possible?

chenx15
22 February 2009, 05:36 AM
I don't know what you guys talking about, but my recent acquired BNIB TT Daytona is "dead on" after 2 weeks since I wear it! I synced it with my iPhone clock apps that show tenth of a second. I just checked it the fourth time today and it's still dead on! Should I be worried? I'm a bit scare now! I have an abnormal watch? Is it possible?

nope, you are a perfectly normal rolex owner!:lol:

Lion
22 February 2009, 05:57 AM
My pepsi gains +5 seconds per day since I bought it in 2007 and my Sub ND(just bought) gains +1 seconds per day. As been explained to me from reading on this Forum, if it gains or looses the same amount each day then it's keeping good time(if within COSC Standards). Now accuracy is all relative, COSC standards are -4 seconds to +6 seconds is considered excellent and is normal for Rolex automatic movements. Now if your watch is not within this range then either it's your wearing habits or it needs to be regulated. Otherwise enjoy your watch and let it do its thing. I would not get obsessed over very slight variances!!!

dmc
9 January 2010, 04:13 AM
I think the COSC standard is around 5-6 secs a day maximum.

http://www.cosc.ch/

p-hunter
9 January 2010, 04:54 AM
My SS Dyatona 116520 slows down 1 sec on 4 days.
I check it everyday to a atomic watch.

larrysb
9 January 2010, 06:32 AM
My brand new (as of 6 weeks ago) platinum Day-Date gains a pretty consistent 4 seconds a day. Crown up at night on the wrist the rest of the time. Gains a bit more if left flat face up. I set it to UTC time on Sunday, at the moment it is 19 seconds fast. It is a "Z" serial number, so I guess it has been in stock for some time, but I bought it new from an AD at the end of November.

I have a Seiko SBQJ015 GMT quartz, with their excellent 8F56 movement. Seiko says it is +/- 10 seconds a year. Mine will stay within half a second of atomic time for months. It's a great functional watch I have to say. Very good bang for the buck.

bobernet
9 January 2010, 06:39 AM
My 9yo 16600 will lose about 3.5 seconds/day if worn 24/7. If I take it off at night and leave face up, it will average about -2.5 to -3 seconds per day.

The watch has never been serviced, but is probably due.

dmc
9 January 2010, 07:26 AM
I don't know what you guys talking about, but my recent acquired BNIB TT Daytona is "dead on" after 2 weeks since I wear it! I synced it with my iPhone clock apps that show tenth of a second. I just checked it the fourth time today and it's still dead on! Should I be worried? I'm a bit scare now! I have an abnormal watch? Is it possible?

You have a watch that was carefully assembled and regulated by a person that is meticulous in everything regarding watches. You are one of the privledged few.

Watch Professor
9 January 2010, 07:55 AM
My GMT IIC loses 1.5 to 2 seconds/day. I thought that this was OK until I saw that JJ's watches are more accurate. I'm obsessive by nature, so should I obsess even more?

dmc
9 January 2010, 07:59 AM
My GMT IIC loses 1.5 to 2 seconds/day. I thought that this was OK until I saw that JJ's watches are more accurate. I'm obsessive by nature, so should I obsess even more?

By all means..........:cheers:

Stevieb
9 January 2010, 08:48 AM
My seiko 7s26 first year around 12s/day now around 15s/day not bad for 120 usd watch....

I've just pulled a Seiko Quartz that I bought for 90 4 years ago out of a drawer where it has been for over a year. I last set the watch in October 2008 when the clocks went back. i remember then that it was -4 secs and I've just tested it again against the same source and it is now -5 secs.

Quite frankly I'm astonished :clap:

Now I'm wondering if it's possible to get a quartz watch regulated and if so where can i get it done :justkiddi

dmc
9 January 2010, 12:12 PM
I believe the accuracy of the 3135, 3185, 3186, 4130 and other Rolex Calibers can be dialed in to very close tolerances. I gather better than +/- 1 second per day. The real crux lies with the watchmaker that times or Adjusts the watch.

I have done a fair amount of reading on this board and others, and It looks to me like it is not all that difficult to attach a watch to a vibragraph or similar timing device, look at the readings open the watch, make the adjustments to the balance wheel, return to the vibragraph, until the watchmaker gets the desired reading. This process assumes that the watch doesn't need service.

That being said I have read where some people have adjusted Rolex watches to some pretty impressive standards, even duplicating quartz like accuracy.

Finally I spoke with a watchmaker today, that I was considering taking my watch to for adjustment, and he told me that if I expected my watch to be adjusted to do better than my current loss of 6 seconds per day, that I should take it to someone else or even send it to Rolex. So this guy in my opinion just told me that he didn't want to try to even get me Cosc accuracy out of my GMTIIC. I'm glad I found this out before letting him handle my watch.

And just for the record I am letting my GMTIIC run out of power, and while I'm doing that I decided to see just how accurate a Seiko Automatic Divers watch that I bought 8 years ago is. In the last 27 hours it has gained 2 seconds total. With a +/- 1 second variance in the same period. This particular watch has been my beater, when I didn't want to mess up my Omega doing yard work, work on the car etc.etc. So what is it that some people are saying about non quartz watch accuracy?

So as some have said choose your watchmaker carefully.

:cheers:

Rolex Freak
9 January 2010, 01:24 PM
I adjusted my YM two days ago with the "official US time clock" at:
http://www.time.gov/timezone.cgi?Eastern/d/-5/java and my watch gained +15 seconds in 48 hours. Is that acceptable or too fast. :thinking:

dmc
9 January 2010, 02:25 PM
I would think that it would be safe to say that that watch fails the COSC standard of -4/+6 seconds a day.

Keep an eye on it for the next 5 days and see what it does. If it continues to gain 7 1/2 seconds a day I would want to get it regulated. But thats just me.

If it doesn't bother you then live with it. Gaining time will only cause you to arrive to a meeting early.

:cheers:

TurboWatch
9 January 2010, 02:35 PM
http://i565.photobucket.com/albums/ss95/HotWatchesdotcom/rolexregulating.jpg

Rolex Freak
9 January 2010, 03:01 PM
I would think that it would be safe to say that that watch fails the COSC standard of -4/+6 seconds a day.

Keep an eye on it for the next 5 days and see what it does. If it continues to gain 7 1/2 seconds a day I would want to get it regulated. But thats just me.

If it doesn't bother you then live with it. Gaining time will only cause you to arrive to a meeting early.

:cheers:

I've re-calabrated at 11pm tonight and I'll check the watch again tomorrow and report. Let's hope I'm in line with the -4/+6 secs/day. I rest the watch on its side (horizontal) with the crown facing up. My understanding is that should slow it down. Thanks.

Rikki
9 January 2010, 03:21 PM
Actual Rolex in house timing specs are 0 to plus 4.9 secs a day but usually 1 to 2 seconds fast when they go out the door. I have the inside skinny. Rik

rkammer
9 January 2010, 03:35 PM
NO!!! That's just how accurate my 3 Rolex models are!! :read::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Yea, right. And, my Corvette gets 67 miles a gallon. :rofl::rofl:

padi56
9 January 2010, 09:08 PM
What Rolex can give the most Accuracy?
I know that it depends from many factors. But, potencially, what movement can show the time more accurate?

Thanks!
According to Swiss COSC its the Rolex ladies cal 2135 that has one of the best first time passes in proportion to movements tested.But today all the complete Rolex mens line up except the chronograph are just clones of the Cal 3135 with or without complications.And reading the many posts on TRF most have no idea how a mechanical movement works.And in theory as the movements parts are mass produced, made by machine they should be all the same.But many factors come into the accuracy of any mechanical watch.Such as earth's gravity, metal expansion and contraction, temperature variations, subtle changes in lubrication and friction, shocks, and so on.But when you look at that mini marvel on your wrist just remember this. In 24 hours, the escapement of a mechanical watch pushes the gears 432,000 times.And since a day has 86,400 seconds, even a watch that runs five minutes fast or slow each day has an accuracy of over 99.6 percent! A finer mechanical watch that gains or loses about 4 to 6 seconds a day or around say half minute a week has a breathtaking precision of over 99.994% what more could you ask from any mechanical watch, think some of you guys want blood.

I think the COSC standard is around 5-6 secs a day maximum.

The now quite antiquated COSC standard for mechanical Swiss movements of Rolex size is a average of -4 to +6 second a day.

Ageing Orphan
9 January 2010, 09:19 PM
Just checked my new GMT IIc. I set it to the exact time at 11.30am gmt on Thursday 31st Dec. It is showing 16 seconds slow after nine days, -1.78 seconds a day. I don't think I'll be sending it to RSC-UK for calibration:chuckle:

dmc
10 January 2010, 02:29 AM
Just checked my new GMT IIc. I set it to the exact time at 11.30am gmt on Thursday 31st Dec. It is showing 16 seconds slow after nine days, -1.78 seconds a day. I don't think I'll be sending it to RSC-UK for calibration:chuckle:

I wish I had your problem. If I were you I would be quite pleased with that amount of deviation.

How long have you had your watch?

Still letting mine run down, still running after nearly 42 hours, it has lost 2 seconds in the last 24 hours resting face up.

slevin kelevra
10 January 2010, 02:39 AM
My brand new Submariner ND has lost roughly one second in 24 hours. I'll be testing it over a 10 day period though.

Ageing Orphan
10 January 2010, 05:19 AM
I wish I had your problem. If I were you I would be quite pleased with that amount of deviation.

How long have you had your watch?

Still letting mine run down, still running after nearly 42 hours, it has lost 2 seconds in the last 24 hours resting face up.

I picked it up on the morning of the 31st. Set the time once I'd taken all the plastic protection off it.

dmc
10 January 2010, 09:02 AM
I picked it up on the morning of the 31st. Set the time once I'd taken all the plastic protection off it.

Thanks for the info.....

That helps me to decide whether or not to wait for mine to settle down. I've had mine since 12/05/09 and it has run as slow as -8 seconds in 24 hours, the average had been -5/6 seconds in 24 hours.

I let it run down until it stopped. And now I'm on another 24hr test. If it doesn't improve significantly I think I have located a really good watchmaker for regulation. I'm hoping that the main spring was in a bind.

More results to come in 24 hours.......

armoredsaint
10 January 2010, 10:07 AM
i compared mine to my atomic clock and it's -2 seconds per 24 hours.

Rolex Freak
10 January 2010, 12:28 PM
I've re-calabrated at 11pm tonight and I'll check the watch again tomorrow and report. Let's hope I'm in line with the -4/+6 secs/day. I rest the watch on its side (horizontal) with the crown facing up. My understanding is that should slow it down. Thanks.

I'm about +6 seconds from re-calibrating at 11pm last night. :thinking:

SteelerFan65
10 January 2010, 01:30 PM
1 second...maybe 2.

RolexPete32
10 January 2010, 01:30 PM
I am getting +.5 to +1 on my air-king and on my Sub +4 sec per day. Last I checked.

Ageing Orphan
10 January 2010, 08:58 PM
Thanks for the info.....

That helps me to decide whether or not to wait for mine to settle down. I've had mine since 12/05/09 and it has run as slow as -8 seconds in 24 hours, the average had been -5/6 seconds in 24 hours.

I let it run down until it stopped. And now I'm on another 24hr test. If it doesn't improve significantly I think I have located a really good watchmaker for regulation. I'm hoping that the main spring was in a bind.

More results to come in 24 hours.......

If you bought it brand new it's still under the Rolex warranty. I would send it to your nearest RSC and have them regulate it for you. I would not let anyone else touch my GMT IIc until it is out of the first 2 year warranty period.

padi56
10 January 2010, 09:39 PM
Thanks for the info.....

That helps me to decide whether or not to wait for mine to settle down. I've had mine since 12/05/09 and it has run as slow as -8 seconds in 24 hours, the average had been -5/6 seconds in 24 hours.

I let it run down until it stopped. And now I'm on another 24hr test. If it doesn't improve significantly I think I have located a really good watchmaker for regulation. I'm hoping that the main spring was in a bind.

More results to come in 24 hours.......

The Swiss COSC is a average -4 +6 a day myself would not bother for just one or two seconds.Give watch a full manual wind 40 full crown turns clockwise.Reset time with reliable time source then wear as normal check time daily with same setting time source.If still loosing a couple of second try resting watch when of wrist lay watch flat dial up.

dmc
11 January 2010, 07:20 AM
Thanks for the info.....

That helps me to decide whether or not to wait for mine to settle down. I've had mine since 12/05/09 and it has run as slow as -8 seconds in 24 hours, the average had been -5/6 seconds in 24 hours.

I let it run down until it stopped. And now I'm on another 24hr test. If it doesn't improve significantly I think I have located a really good watchmaker for regulation. I'm hoping that the main spring was in a bind.

More results to come in 24 hours.......

Well I've dreaded this post since 1230. My watch lost 5 seconds in 24 hours.

So much for my theory on the mainspring having a bind in it.

It's going to get regulated, and soon!!!!!!!

:cheers:

dmc
11 January 2010, 07:22 AM
If you bought it brand new it's still under the Rolex warranty. I would send it to your nearest RSC and have them regulate it for you. I would not let anyone else touch my GMT IIc until it is out of the first 2 year warranty period.

Thanks for the suggestion........

dmc
11 January 2010, 07:32 AM
The Swiss COSC is a average -4 +6 a day myself would not bother for just one or two seconds.Give watch a full manual wind 40 full crown turns clockwise.Reset time with reliable time source then wear as normal check time daily with same setting time source.If still loosing a couple of second try resting watch when of wrist lay watch flat dial up.



Thanks for the suggestion.

I'm thinking about taking it to a Master Watchmaker. I get the impression that he is as good as what they have at Rolex. I think this guy will be more precise than the tech that timed my watch at Rolex.

swisstimezone.com

dmc
12 January 2010, 12:52 PM
Well I checked my watch at the end of another 24 hours my watch had lost 7seconds :banghead:.

I stompted around the house for a couple of hours, and decided to give Peter Baier, at "Swiss Time" a call. He said he could adjust my watch today, so I went to his shop.

He took my watch right on in. He asked me how slow I thought it was, I told him that it had lost 7 seconds in the last 24hrs. Before he timed it I asked to look at the movement everything is as it should be, from what I could see.

I browsed around in is shop for about 15 minutes, when he came out of the back and said you should like this a lot better. It was in fact losing 7-8 seconds a day. And he said that he had found a hair, yes a hair on the balance wheel while he was adjusting it. He said he had only seen that once before, and that was on a Patek Phillip it was losing 18 seconds a day.

All I can say is I was very impressed with his shop, and the inventory he has. And when it comes time for my next watch service I will gladly use his services.

I'll post back the 24hr results tomorrow after 1730, as far as I can tell I don't think there is any change in the last 3 1/2 hours.

ebrigm
12 January 2010, 03:00 PM
My LV gains about 2 seconds a day. I'm totally ok with that. That means it will only gain 1 minute every 30 days. Pretty good. :thumbsup:

dmc
13 January 2010, 11:43 AM
Well I checked my watch at the end of another 24 hours my watch had lost 7seconds :banghead:.

I stompted around the house for a couple of hours, and decided to give Peter Baier, at "Swiss Time" a call. He said he could adjust my watch today, so I went to his shop.

He took my watch right on in. He asked me how slow I thought it was, I told him that it had lost 7 seconds in the last 24hrs. Before he timed it I asked to look at the movement everything is as it should be, from what I could see.

I browsed around in is shop for about 15 minutes, when he came out of the back and said you should like this a lot better. It was in fact losing 7-8 seconds a day. And he said that he had found a hair, yes a hair on the balance wheel while he was adjusting it. He said he had only seen that once before, and that was on a Patek Phillip it was losing 18 seconds a day.

All I can say is I was very impressed with his shop, and the inventory he has. And when it comes time for my next watch service I will gladly use his services.

I'll post back the 24hr results tomorrow after 1730, as far as I can tell I don't think there is any change in the last 3 1/2 hours.


Well after 24hr's I'm at +2 seconds, I can live with this a lot better than losing 5-8 seconds a day.

:cheers:

donas
13 January 2010, 04:14 PM
I checked my GMT ll for 48 hours, 2.5 seconds a day.

JimC
13 January 2010, 06:02 PM
My Sub is about +3. The GMT is running about +10. I've been very disappointed in the Explorer II. It's running +15, but I've noticed the clutch slips at around 30 winds of the crown. Make a "horrible" clicking noise; it needs service. It only runs around 41 hours on a full wind.

My Deepsea actually regulates as they indicate for "older" watches. On it's back, it seems to gain, on the side (opposite the crown) it does lose a couple, and on the crown seems to be best. I can actually regulate to where it is less than a second, plus or minus in 24 hours. I am quite impressed with this one.

aggie012
19 January 2010, 07:57 AM
My air king which was purchased new at an AD over christmas is gaining 9 seconds a day. I have been wearing the watch at least every other day. Should I take it into a store and have them fix it or call a rolex service center?

Thank you!

slevin kelevra
19 January 2010, 08:46 AM
Gaining 9 seconds a day is quite a lot. In my opinion id get it looked into.

I got a brand new sub ND over the holidays and its lost 4 seconds since I started checking the accuracy about 8 days ago. I wear it pretty much everyday but dont wear it to bed.

Im pretty happy with the accuracy.

DLagent
19 January 2010, 01:46 PM
According to Swiss COSC its the Rolex ladies cal 2135 that has one of the best first time passes in proportion to movements tested.But today all the complete Rolex mens line up except the chronograph are just clones of the Cal 3135 with or without complications.And reading the many posts on TRF most have no idea how a mechanical movement works.And in theory as the movements parts are mass produced, made by machine they should be all the same.But many factors come into the accuracy of any mechanical watch.Such as earth's gravity, metal expansion and contraction, temperature variations, subtle changes in lubrication and friction, shocks, and so on.But when you look at that mini marvel on your wrist just remember this. In 24 hours, the escapement of a mechanical watch pushes the gears 432,000 times.And since a day has 86,400 seconds, even a watch that runs five minutes fast or slow each day has an accuracy of over 99.6 percent! A finer mechanical watch that gains or loses about 4 to 6 seconds a day or around say half minute a week has a breathtaking precision of over 99.994% what more could you ask from any mechanical watch, think some of you guys want blood.



The now quite antiquated COSC standard for mechanical Swiss movements of Rolex size is a average of -4 to +6 second a day.

Padi,

I just want to thank you for putting this in perspective for me!!! I just got my first Rolex, an M-serial 14060M that's about 11 months new, about a week and a half ago from Matt here on TRF (mrh1797). Since I purchased it, it seems to be running around 7.5 seconds fast per day. It has been aggravating me quite a bit, but you make a great point - if my watch "goofs up" on 7.5 out of 86,400 seconds per day, it is still 99.9913% accurate.

Rolex movements are, to me, mindblowing marvels of technology and the abilities of man, and I'm learning to accept that minor inaccuracies (VERY minor ones) are part of the charm of having a mechanical watch. If it just was about telling time, I'd buy some sort of high-tech digital marvel that recalibrates to the atomic clock at 12:00am every day (and that probably costs 1/100th what I spent on my Sub)... but it's NOT just about telling time, and having this watch on my wrist every day gives me so much pleasure that I don't really feel the need to spend money on shipping and be without it for however long, just so the RSC could knock it back into COSC standards of -4/+6 seconds... even if it means that I'll show up about 4 minutes early to a meeting if I forget to recalibrate my watch for an entire month.

Yes, it's okay to hold your Rolex to high standards, but it's also good to remember exactly what's inside the case and enjoy it!!!

DL:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

donas
19 January 2010, 05:38 PM
For comparison sake, I set my Z series GMT 8 days ago, it is now 18 seconds fast.....I believe I can live with that.

dmc
29 January 2010, 06:05 PM
Quick follow up on Peter Baier at Swiss Time on Hilton Head Island, SC, adjusting my GMTIIC. After 12 days I figurd it was running about 3.2 seconds per day fast. So I took the watch back in last Saturday, and he adjusted it again.

Well It has been perfect ever since Saturday, I mean no loss or gain compared to the clock at gmt247.com. Needless to say I am thrilled.

A Rolex can keep perfect time after all...........

:cheers:

Boadicea
30 January 2010, 01:49 AM
I got a brand new sub ND over the holidays and its lost 4 seconds since I started checking the accuracy about 8 days ago. I wear it pretty much everyday but dont wear it to bed.

Im pretty happy with the accuracy.

Funny enough, that is the exact numbers I have on my explorer with the same 3130 movement. I am very happy with it. :thumbsup:

SCD
4 February 2010, 04:14 PM
I bought a new Air King last November at an AD that has a very good watchmaker on staff. The AK was running very consistently 7 seconds fast so I brought it in to get regulated. Since then if I wear it 'round the clock it loses about a 10th of a second per day with extreme precision. If I leave it face up on the bathroom counter overnight it'll gain back about 1/4 of a second. Not bad!

These things can be regulated to a range of something like +/- 90 seconds/day, so I gather that how close they are to COSC spec is a matter of adjustment, not quality. It's the consistency of the rate where these things seem to stand out. If I wear my watch 'round the clock it loses time at an incredibly constant daily rate that adds up to a little less than a second per week.

Speedmeister
4 February 2010, 04:26 PM
My new SD was running +-0 for almost two weeks. It has finally gained a second..

NorthernPike
5 February 2010, 12:30 PM
Hi, I had to join this forum to add to this thread. I see a few fellow Canadians on here and this subject has been bugging me since I bought my 16610LV a year and a half ago.
It is utterly consistent, day after day as I check regularly with the National Time Signal. Unfortunately it is +6 seconds every day. I've tried placing it in various positions overnight, (though I prefer to wear it) but no difference. Since its within spec.s (barely) I don't really have a reason to complain, but since its always the same, I know it can be more accurately regulated.
I mentioned it once to the AD I bought it from, and was told basically that its working within spec.s and its not a concern.
I'd like to get it fine tuned while still under warranty, but don't know if that's something I can convince my AD to do for me. What do you guys think?
Have you had any experiences with Rolex service centres in Toronto? I know of 2 in the west end (one I purchased at) and the official Rolex headquarters downtown.
Thanks!

Highhorology
5 February 2010, 02:07 PM
Whew, I guess I'll weigh in on this one. When I worked at Rolex we timed the watches in 5 positions crown down, crown left, crown up, dial up and dial down. It can be timed in crown right but most people don't walk around with their hand up over their shoulder all the time.

Having said that there is what is called isochronism. Isochronism means that the rate is the same between the short arcs and long arcs of the balance wheel. O.K. so if your balance wheel is isochronous then it won't gain or loose regardless of the amount of power reserve right? Wrong! The fact is that the power transmission that takes place in the escapement is a net loss due to that little thing called friction.

So then the balance wheel is designed to be a little fast to make up for the loss in friction, and slightly faster in the short arcs than the long arcs. What does this mean to you the guy wearing the watch? It means that even a properly adjusted chronometer will tend to gain a little if not kept wound at least above half wind. Six hours of normal movement per day should do it, if not and if it is important to you then you should consider either winding your watch once a day or getting a winder to put it on at night.

The hairsprings of most Rolex are what is called the over coil or Breguet style which is designed to compensate the errors caused by the pining point on the hairspring collet. In addition to that the hairpring is pinned to the poised collet in such a way as to enable a watch maker to adjust any loss in the oscillating mechanism to one particular position, namely the pendant right position.

All this being said, yes your Rolex watch can certainly run at +-0 sec. a day +3-5 sec. a day is acceptable for a warrantied repair or a new watch. I like to see 0 to +2 sec. a day. Yeah their pretty accurate.

There should never be a loss unless a major impact puts the watch way out of beat, or if you sleep on the bathroom floor and get up to go!

haakon59
5 February 2010, 02:12 PM
Wouldn't the normal gain be 24 hours? :rofl:

Earl Camembert
5 February 2010, 02:55 PM
My 1968 DD does not have a hacking mechanism so it is difficult to set it to the exact time. Before it fell 7 feet onto a tile floor it was about 4 seconds a day slow; it is now 14 seconds slow but that is consistent.

slevin kelevra
6 February 2010, 02:16 AM
Whew, I guess I'll weigh in on this one. When I worked at Rolex we timed the watches in 5 positions crown down, crown left, crown up, dial up and dial down. It can be timed in crown right but most people don't walk around with their hand up over their shoulder all the time.

Having said that there is what is called isochronism. Isochronism means that the rate is the same between the short arcs and long arcs of the balance wheel. O.K. so if your balance wheel is isochronous then it won't gain or loose regardless of the amount of power reserve right? Wrong! The fact is that the power transmission that takes place in the escapement is a net loss due to that little thing called friction.

So then the balance wheel is designed to be a little fast to make up for the loss in friction, and slightly faster in the short arcs than the long arcs. What does this mean to you the guy wearing the watch? It means that even a properly adjusted chronometer will tend to gain a little if not kept wound at least above half wind. Six hours of normal movement per day should do it, if not and if it is important to you then you should consider either winding your watch once a day or getting a winder to put it on at night.

The hairsprings of most Rolex are what is called the over coil or Breguet style which is designed to compensate the errors caused by the pining point on the hairspring collet. In addition to that the hairpring is pinned to the poised collet in such a way as to enable a watch maker to adjust any loss in the oscillating mechanism to one particular position, namely the pendant right position.

All this being said, yes your Rolex watch can certainly run at +-0 sec. a day +3-5 sec. a day is acceptable for a warrantied repair or a new watch. I like to see 0 to +2 sec. a day. Yeah their pretty accurate.

There should never be a loss unless a major impact puts the watch way out of beat, or if you sleep on the bathroom floor and get up to go!

Very interesting read mate.

Id like to add one thing though! I wear my 1 month old sub ND for at least 6 hours each day and leave it face up at night and it consistently looses half a second a day when timed over a 10 day period.

You have stated that a watch will always gain time. I find that not to be the case with mine. Or I suppose one argument could be that I could leave it in a different position overnight but then again im pretty happy with the accuracy so there isnt much point.

Highhorology
7 February 2010, 02:52 AM
Very interesting read mate.

Id like to add one thing though! I wear my 1 month old sub ND for at least 6 hours each day and leave it face up at night and it consistently looses half a second a day when timed over a 10 day period.

You have stated that a watch will always gain time. I find that not to be the case with mine. Or I suppose one argument could be that I could leave it in a different position overnight but then again im pretty happy with the accuracy so there isnt much point.

I guess I should rephrase that a properly maintained and adjusted Rolex should never loose time even if the power reserve drops below 1/2 wind. I would expect that your watch will slowly begin to gain a little as time goes on.

slevin kelevra
9 February 2010, 03:12 AM
:thumbsup: