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Old 9 November 2011, 07:35 AM   #1
aquanaut
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Dssd problem.

Hello, in saturation diving chamber iat the moment, wearing my deepsea. Problem is that when i pull out the crown to wind it, the crown seems to get 'sucked' back in, as if a vacuum behind it. I have to keep it held out to adjust time etc. any suggestions? Also does not feel as if its winding either more free running.
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Old 9 November 2011, 08:19 AM   #2
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You're in a decompression chamber. The pressure is greater in the chamber than inside the watch, no? That would force it back in perhaps. Should the watch be opened under pressure? Not sure if thats a good idea.
I look forward to other replies as Im not sure. Good luck.
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Old 9 November 2011, 08:20 AM   #3
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Hello, in saturation diving chamber iat the moment, wearing my deepsea. Problem is that when i pull out the crown to wind it, the crown seems to get 'sucked' back in, as if a vacuum behind it. I have to keep it held out to adjust time etc. any suggestions? Also does not feel as if its winding either more free running.
Si, Hmmmm You dont Know Greg Donohugh by any chance do you squire?

Jon
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Old 9 November 2011, 08:30 AM   #4
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Nyc6...this is what the deepsea is designed for! Hence helium relief valve! Not decompressing the moment? Sorry, do not know Greg D i'm afraid!
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Old 9 November 2011, 08:33 AM   #5
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Nyc6...this is what the deepsea is designed for! Hence helium relief valve! Not decompressing the moment? Sorry, do not know Greg D i'm afraid!
Is it possible the release valve is stuck? And therefore the pressure isn’t equalised?

Or am I just talking
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Old 9 November 2011, 08:43 AM   #6
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Not at all, was wondering that myself!
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Old 9 November 2011, 08:58 AM   #7
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The gas escape valve is to let helium (entering the watch while in a high pressure decompression chamber) to escape as the pressure in the decompression chamber is reduced - to avoid Helium pressure exploding the watch from the inside.

If there is little helium entering the watch, then the pressure within the watch would remain closer to atmospheric. In the high pressure decompression chamber, the pressure would tend to push the crown in.
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Old 9 November 2011, 09:17 AM   #8
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The gas escape valve is to let helium (entering the watch while in a high pressure decompression chamber) to escape as the pressure in the decompression chamber is reduced - to avoid Helium pressure exploding the watch from the inside.

If there is little helium entering the watch, then the pressure within the watch would remain closer to atmospheric. In the high pressure decompression chamber, the pressure would tend to push the crown in.

The HEV is a one way valve. It wouldnt work so well if it let air/H2O in!

Whats the pressure in the chamber now? And why are you in it if not decompressing?
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Old 9 November 2011, 09:37 AM   #9
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In the chamber as working as a deep sea diver. The storage depth is 129 meters. Can be in here for 4 weeks inc decompression. UK sector.
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Old 9 November 2011, 09:42 AM   #10
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In the chamber as working as a deep sea diver. The storage depth is 129 meters. Can be in here for 4 weeks inc decompression. UK sector.
All I can say is WOW I had no idea you could be in there that long!
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Old 9 November 2011, 09:46 AM   #11
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I know! Only on day 4! still works out well 4 xmas!
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Old 9 November 2011, 09:47 AM   #12
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You sir are truly one of the few individuals best suited for the SD/DSSD!
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Old 9 November 2011, 09:48 AM   #13
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The problem makes sense. If you are in a higher pressure environment than sea level, the watch will be a vacuum inside. The seal in the tube will not allow it to equalize. That is how it should act. Why do you have to set the watch? Did your timezone change? As far as winding, you could bring a winder, or use the movement of your wrist. I would say you are stuck as far as setting it. I would not force it out, as it may brake the stem.

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Old 9 November 2011, 09:56 AM   #14
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Just curious. How deep were you and how long at that depth to have to decompress for 4 weeks?
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Old 9 November 2011, 10:02 AM   #15
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This is a way cool post! Posting to follow!!!
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Old 9 November 2011, 10:04 AM   #16
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At the moment 129 meters. Next job is deeper so decompression will take nearly 7 days. Which means we would have to start on day 21. So we keep to 28 days max.
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Old 9 November 2011, 10:09 AM   #17
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The crown when opened is still designed to keep the watch sealed. The pressure in the watch is less than outside. I don't think you actually have an issue. I don't think the crown is supposed to be unscrewed at pressure.

I have a few friends that are sat divers for Oceaneering. One actually told me about a fellow diver that had a Sub blow the glass out of a watch. I asked him for picks but never got them. The SD is still the most common watch they said but a lot of the divers switched to oil filled watches too. I think Sinn makes one that's oil filled and can handle any pressure.
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Old 9 November 2011, 10:15 AM   #18
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Only 3771 meter left of safe use of your DSSD! Very cool to hear about a watch doing the job it was designed for. My ExplorerII keeps asking to go caving, but so far I haven't let it.
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Old 9 November 2011, 10:22 AM   #19
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Quote:
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In the chamber as working as a deep sea diver. The storage depth is 129 meters. Can be in here for 4 weeks inc decompression. UK sector.
My rough calculations have you at about 164psi at a minimum. Thats way more than enough to cause your original issues.

The crown opened is designed to keep the watch sealed and intact at surface pressures not at depth! Open a crown while diving at 100ft and see what happens.
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Old 9 November 2011, 11:05 AM   #20
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Cheers nyc6 for reply, makes sense! You forget sometimes. No damage done anyway. Thanks
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Old 9 November 2011, 11:30 AM   #21
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Cool thread
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Old 9 November 2011, 11:44 AM   #22
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My rough calculations have you at about 164psi at a minimum. Thats way more than enough to cause your original issues.

The crown opened is designed to keep the watch sealed and intact at surface pressures not at depth! Open a crown while diving at 100ft and see what happens.
I get 184 psi .

So if by opening the crown, he filled it up to pressure, he's definitely going to see if the HEV works. It relieves at 3 to 5 atmospheres differential pressure which it will see several times during decompression. At 184 psi it is at 12.5 atmospheres.
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Old 9 November 2011, 11:53 AM   #23
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This might be the first only real useful thread in the history of watch forums!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:02 PM   #24
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FINALLY someone with a cool-card to actually carry a DSSD! :-)

Thanks for posting, please do stay involved, e.g. I'd love to see some photos from the environment. I hear you have time to kill! ;-)
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:03 PM   #25
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This might be the first only real useful thread in the history of watch forums!!!!!!!!!!
You must be reading the wrong threads Mickey!!!




The answer is already posted by Eddie!!
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:05 PM   #26
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You must be reading the wrong threads Mickey!!!




The answer is already posted by Eddie!!

Man I can't say anything that pleases you...
It was a way of saying great informative technical post....
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:08 PM   #27
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Man I can't say anything that pleases you...
It was a way of saying great informative technical post....

I think you're reading in more than you need.

Maybe your last sentence would have been better.. Instead of the 'First only useful thread in the history of watch forums'?!?!?! Just sayin'!
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:10 PM   #28
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This one should be "stickied" for ever, truly amazing watch and diver at work
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:17 PM   #29
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This thread just makes me smile!!!

Absolutly perfect owner for that watch!!!!

Good on ya man and thanks for posting :)
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Old 9 November 2011, 12:19 PM   #30
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Makes me want to delete my wimpy 103ft. Dive pictures wearing my DSSD.


-Eddie
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