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Old 18 August 2018, 08:43 AM   #61
037
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Originally Posted by ExPADIdiver View Post
Been ruined for about 5 years now imho. Flame on.
"Ruined" in what way, exactly?

If anything is a negative in my book, I can really only complain that prices have increased and fakes are more rampant -- but both are unavoidable in any hobby that gains popularity. Prices are impossible to predict so I wouldn't personally put that in the "ruined" category. Fake cases, dials, inserts and full watches are where things get tricky with vintage. That does tend to ruin it.

But, I'm like 05carbondrz in enjoying my time so far. I cut my teeth in vintage with a 1665 SD over a decade ago but am enjoying it again after recently picking up an older GMT. If the vintage market picks up or slows down, my investment isn't so big that I'll care one way or the other. That helps keep it fun.

Vintage won't likely die. There will always be those who prefer old over the new no matter how good the new stuff is made.
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Old 18 August 2018, 09:13 AM   #62
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I don’t post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here I’ve learned a lot. I’ve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I don’t have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like it’s any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, I’m surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They aren’t flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what I’m trying to say to y’all ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didn’t ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Here’s the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolex’. Of course you don’t know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolex’ in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You don’t need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means “you done good,” into the future.

And there’s is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. It’s all just a rerun.

Rolex’ stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. They’re not selling watches; they’re selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesn’t go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.
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Old 18 August 2018, 09:19 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now to protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand characteristics with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists. And that those names from the previous lists are caretaking the idea of that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it.

Simple.
Extremely intelligent outlook,I agree 100%.
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Old 18 August 2018, 09:36 AM   #64
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Extremely intelligent outlook,I agree 100%.
Thank you.

I amended my original post some from the one you quoted. Thoughts kept bombarding my mind.
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Old 18 August 2018, 10:03 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
...Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.

You know... if think youíre right on so many levels. The Rolex brand values are set for several generations to come.

I know this is a Rolex centric community but what about the vintage pieces the hard core guys also collect? UG Evil Ninaís? Omega Ed Whites and early Seamasters? Heuer Cameros? How about the defunct vintage microbrands like Pierce?

These too are experiencing the same issues discussed in this thread and donít have cool brand ambassadors...


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Old 18 August 2018, 10:06 AM   #66
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You know... if think youíre right on so many levels. The Rolex brand values are set for several generations to come.

I know this is a Rolex centric community but what about the vintage pieces the hard core guys also collect? UG Evil Ninaís? Omega Ed Whites and early Seamasters? Heuer Cameros? How about the defunct vintage microbrands like Pierce?

These too are experiencing the same issues discussed in this thread and donít have cool brand ambassadors...


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Did Someone say early Seamaster?

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Old 18 August 2018, 11:09 AM   #67
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There will always be those who prefer old over the new no matter how good the new stuff is made.
I meant to say 'well', not 'good'. It's too late to edit.
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Old 18 August 2018, 11:31 AM   #68
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Is vintage collecting a dying hobby?

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Originally Posted by 05carbondrz View Post
Did Someone say early Seamaster?


Now THATS how I roll...and this thread needed a pic.

But in 20 years my kids will probably think itís just a bit of dads old junk that ONLY tells time.

Very nice tho




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Old 18 August 2018, 11:55 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by ExPADIdiver View Post
Been ruined for about 5 years now imho. Flame on.
You're probably a dive/sports watch collector like 99% of this site. Your opinions mean little to those who collect pieces which could actually be considered vintage.
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Old 18 August 2018, 11:56 AM   #70
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Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

And thereís is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. Itís all just a rerun.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. Theyíre not selling watches; theyíre selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesnít go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.

So true and well put.
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Old 18 August 2018, 12:09 PM   #71
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Is vintage collecting a dying hobby?

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Originally Posted by ExPADIdiver View Post
Been ruined for about 5 years now imho. Flame on.

Given youíre all done with PADI and disenchanted with divers, you should head over to omegaforums. The Constellation and Seamaster guys are liviní large with very accessible prices still. Pipe and Slippers sort of crowd though.


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Old 18 August 2018, 12:18 PM   #72
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Pipe and Slippers sort of crowd though.
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Old 19 August 2018, 02:05 AM   #73
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It's doubtful anyone alive on this forum..has ever experienced anything remotefully like the depression of the 1920's..
If this returns ..its endgame for a lot of companies..
Back to basics..like bread and water..lol..
When the money stops.. as it will some day..everything will reconfigure..
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Old 19 August 2018, 02:06 AM   #74
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It's doubtful anyone alive on this forum..has ever experienced anything remotefully like the depression of the 1920's..
If this returns ..its endgame for a lot of companies..
Back to basics..like bread and water..lol..
When the money stops.. as it will some day..everything will reconfigure..
And we will have much bigger problems than worrying for collecting vintage watches. :)

Whatever this had to do with this thread?
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Old 19 August 2018, 02:13 AM   #75
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Whatever this had to do with this thread?
It's coming..
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Old 19 August 2018, 07:15 AM   #76
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My post got deleted so I am not allowed to voice my opinion. Enjoy the plantation.
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Old 19 August 2018, 07:42 AM   #77
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Because many guys, young and old, love old mechanical watches, especially cool vintage Rolexes, the hobby will never die, not in the foreseeable future anyway. It'll change, become even more exclusive because of ever-rising prices, but it will live on.

This hobby has never interested me as an investment strategy. I just like cool old things ... vintage cars, motorcycles, guitars, and yes, Rolexes.

I'm wearing an old Seiko right now, not my Big Red 6263. Why? Because I love cool old watches, no matter what it is. I'm not alone.
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Old 19 August 2018, 08:40 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

And thereís is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. Itís all just a rerun.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. Theyíre not selling watches; theyíre selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesnít go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.
Either you own an advertising firm, or you just know how to get a perfect point across.

Love it. 100% agree
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Old 20 August 2018, 06:46 PM   #79
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Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

And thereís is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. Itís all just a rerun.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. Theyíre not selling watches; theyíre selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesnít go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.
Well put! referential power is a powerful tool. Just like how Rolex used James Bond movies for product placement.
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Old 20 August 2018, 09:34 PM   #80
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It's doubtful anyone alive on this forum..has ever experienced anything remotefully like the depression of the 1920's..

Some pocket watches from this era are still running strong having survived and outlived their owners. 100 years later, itís an eccentric few that still collect pocket watches. 100 years from now after the next big depression itíll be an eccentric few collecting old tool watches.



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Old 21 August 2018, 12:49 AM   #81
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extremely intelligent outlook,i agree 100%.
x2
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Old 21 August 2018, 02:00 AM   #82
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x2
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Old 21 August 2018, 02:52 AM   #83
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I am 25 and although I do wear an Apple Watch everyday for work and gym, my weekend go to is a mechanical watch. But you do have to see it from the eyes of someone younger. For some of us we came out of college in debt, we still have to buy a home, and put a lot of focus on savings and investments. Although many see watch collecting as an investment, it’s not nearly as easy to sell a watch as it is to pull money out of other investments. While I love Rolex I didn’t purchase my first one until last year (24 years old) simply because I couldn’t afford one. My initial collecting somewhere around 19/20 years old went straight into older Omegas because they not only look good but can be had for extremely fair prices. A lot of people of my generation look at Rolex more as a status symbol than the work of art that it is, and it’s truly up to older generations who do collect, to share the reasons why.
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Old 21 August 2018, 05:51 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

And thereís is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. Itís all just a rerun.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. Theyíre not selling watches; theyíre selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesnít go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.

Very well said! You sir are a wise man.
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Old 21 August 2018, 05:57 AM   #85
shaunylw
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I am looking forward to people losing interest in the 6263 and the 6265. As soon as possible would be great! I think our interested in vintage is stronger than ever. Are new collectors interested in vintage? I think not so many. I think i am also a rare case. I love vintage Rolex, i don't particularly care for cars, and i am 31 years old. Most of my friends are obsessed over cars, the newest technology and could care less about watches. The ones that are into watches, don't care about vintage.
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Old 21 August 2018, 06:01 AM   #86
shaunylw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

And thereís is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. Itís all just a rerun.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. Theyíre not selling watches; theyíre selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesnít go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.
So well written i deleted what i was writing.
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Old 21 August 2018, 06:43 AM   #87
NOPDK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusko.Popov View Post
I donít post in the vintage section much. But thanks to the many smart people here Iíve learned a lot. Iíve increasingly gravitated to this sub forum because I donít have to see pictures of the same watch being acquired and people posting pictures of it like itís any different than the last guy who bought and posted the identical watch the day before.

But back on topic, Iím surprised that no one has mentioned a point which I think is salient and key ... Rolex, unlike stamps, pocket watches, and high wheel bikes, have taken considerable steps to ensure a continuing brand relevance.

From actors, to rappers, to rock stars, to sports stars and other brand ambassadors, Rolex has an undeniable presence and signinificance amongst people who are going to spend money tomorrow.

Rolex is thinking ahead to tomorrow. They arenít flooding the market with pieces right now in order that they might protect the value of the crown tomorrow.

That contributes to luxurification and status.

And the fact is that (to any pedestrian consumer) a new submariner looks like the vintage submariners in silhouette and design. There are obviously key distinctive evolutionary design differences but because of the undeniable visual similarities between each generation of submariner, gmt, et al., I believe that the interest in vintage will parallel the continuing and sustained interest in the brand.

If Rolex can maintain that interest in the brand going forward.

And therein lay the substance of what Iím trying to say to yíall ...

I believe that the interest in the brand is guaranteed by Rolex using influencers who matter to the people who are spending money now and will spend money tomorrow.

James Dean didnít ride a high wheel bike.

When print ads gave way to the television medium, there were no pocket watch product placements.

The failure of baseball card collecting, and pocket watches was a failure of vision and acknowledging that times change. They failed to associate their brand message/motif with a rapidly changing world. They failed to stay relevant to tomorrow when the core who established the initial interest moved on.

Hereís the thing though ...

Drake, Jay Z and Rihanna wear Rolexí. Of course you donít know who they are. But your kids or grandkids probably do.

Justin Bieber, Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Brad Pitt all wear Rolexí in a lot of public places that are posted all over the interwebs.

Incidentally so does Adam Levine, Tiger Woods, and Roger Federer.

They adorn Rolex as a status symbol just like McQueen and Connery and Newman did 40 years ago. You know those names. You donít need to know any from those previous lists. You just need to know that your posterity knows the names from the previous lists.

Admitting that you know who Drake or Justin Bieber are might get you kicked out of a country club in some areas of the country.

What you need to know is that those names from the previous lists - rappers, rock stars, sports stars and such - are caretaking the idea that that crown on your wrist means ďyou done good,Ē into the future.

And thereís is a public, very visible, very influential, stature and platform.

McQueen to Brad Pitt. Clapton to Jay Z.

The formula is simple. Itís all just a rerun.

Rolexí stratagem is a fairly simple one: continue to identify the brand with achievement and status. Use people who matter to tomorrow in order to do it. Theyíre not selling watches; theyíre selling the idea of what constitutes luxury. And luxury doesnít go out of style. Focus less on the function of the watch itself and more on the idea that when you made it, like really made it, you buy a Rolex.

Simple and ironically time proof.
Somebody buy this man a beer. Very well said! This is the first time I think I've agreed with somebody using Drake or Bieber as a reference...
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Old 21 August 2018, 06:45 AM   #88
MorningTundra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaunylw View Post
I am looking forward to people losing interest in the 6263 and the 6265. As soon as possible would be great! I think our interested in vintage is stronger than ever. Are new collectors interested in vintage? I think not so many. I think i am also a rare case. I love vintage Rolex, i don't particularly care for cars, and i am 31 years old. Most of my friends are obsessed over cars, the newest technology and could care less about watches. The ones that are into watches, don't care about vintage.
Does your interest only stretch to Rolex or do you collect other brands too?

Is it the aspirational brand values that attracts you? As I understand it, the 6263 and 6265 aren't exactly "rare".
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Old 21 August 2018, 07:00 AM   #89
roh123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MorningTundra View Post
As I understand it, the 6263 and 6265 aren't exactly "rare".
Some of them are. Most are not.
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Old 21 August 2018, 07:21 AM   #90
05carbondrz
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Rare doesn’t mean expensive and vise versa.
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