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Old 18 September 2020, 12:40 AM   #1
rangel23
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Watchmaking

My dad and I are wanting to explore the watch making world. Is their a particular make and model of automatic watch that is easy to work on. We would want the watch to be inexpensive. Also any tools that would need to get started . We have no experience with watchmaking just Rolex enthusiasts. Thanks 🙏
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Old 18 September 2020, 07:18 AM   #2
vesnyder
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I have the same interest - curious what you find. Esslinger is a good site for tools - that have everything you might need.
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Old 18 September 2020, 08:07 AM   #3
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Time Zone has an on-line course to do and learn at your leisure.

Otto Frei sells complete tool kits that include a movement to work on if you are taking one of these on-line courses.
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Old 18 September 2020, 03:41 PM   #4
SearChart
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I would start with an ETA 6897, or Chinese equivalent. It is cheap, easy to work with and easy to see and understand the workings. It is the first movement most watchmaking schools start with.
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Old 18 September 2020, 06:25 PM   #5
Aquaholic_user
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I started with modding seikos and citizens. Find them cheap on ebay in any condition. Anything is possible with sites like yobokies or dagaz for hands and dials, esslinger and ebay for the tools. Have fun!

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Old 18 September 2020, 08:11 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SearChart View Post
I would start with an ETA 6897, or Chinese equivalent. It is cheap, easy to work with and easy to see and understand the workings. It is the first movement most watchmaking schools start with.
I agree, the seagull clone of the 6497/6498 cost under 40 each and for tinkering or practicing they are a great movement.
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Old 19 September 2020, 02:53 AM   #7
Fred48
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I'd also check out Mark Lovick https://www.watchrepairlessons.com/ and also this guy (a graduate of Mark's classes) Wristwatch revival https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCD8...a4K682CQDGwEKQ

Mark's video classes are very good, and everything he says are also in print.

Have fun!
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Old 19 September 2020, 03:22 AM   #8
Rolexoman
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I have been playing with 2414-A movements along with a few others, they are cheap and built like tanks, I got a lot of my stuff from Esslinger and ebay
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Old 21 September 2020, 02:29 AM   #9
Rolex tom
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Yep 6497/8 is the way to go, best of luck. First watch I ever took apart was a Waltham traveller which had a similar large scale movement inside. Though that watch had an overcoil hairspring Which I would avoid when taking apart your first movement.
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Old 26 September 2020, 12:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred48 View Post
I'd also check out Mark Lovick https://www.watchrepairlessons.com/ and also this guy (a graduate of Mark's classes) Wristwatch revival https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCD8...a4K682CQDGwEKQ

Mark's video classes are very good, and everything he says are also in print.

Have fun!

I second Mike Lovick's videos. They are great and really show you step by step how to take apart and rebuild many movements. I'd also suggest getting the book The Theory of Horology as well as Henry Fried's "The Watch Repairer's Manual." Both are excellent and must reads.

I'd also recommend joining AWCI and taking their classes. Right now, they are doing webinars, but they are also doing their "Explore Watchmaking" series from home. If you choose, you can purchase everything from them (including a 6497 from ETA or Chinese version), and a nice tool kit from Bergeon that contains a few extra things they throw in. Parts 3 and 4, I hope, will be forthcoming and cover lubrication and timing adjustments, respectively. (Parts 1 and 2 were basic assembly and escapement). Once Covid is over, they have on-site instruction that's excellent.

Another avenue is to try to find an experienced watchmaker that will mentor you (this is what I have done, along with joining AWCI and getting books). A lot of watchmaking is book knowledge, but it's practice and practical tips and knowledge that make the difference. The more you practice under supervision, the better you'll get.

To get all the tools you'll need, be ready for some sticker shock. Some of these things can be expensive (screwdriver set, tweezer set, an adequate bench, bench lighting, case cushion, movement holder, oilers, different oils and greases, ultrasonic cleaner...etc). But, you may be able to get some things used from a watchmaker who is retiring, or otherwise find a good deal. It's totally worth it even if you never do it for money - these things last a long time and you'll get a lot of enjoyment either servicing your own watches or putting watches together from various parts. And, if you go on eBay and see something you like listed as "parts only" or "not running," you'll be able to get it anyway and fix it . (Note: getting parts that are broken for some vintage pieces can be tough, but not impossible).
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