The Rolex Forums   The Rolex Watch

ROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEX

Old 1 December 2022, 02:44 AM   #1
Blansky
2023 Pledge Member
 
Blansky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: swmnpoolsmovie*
Posts: 8,003
The Key Change in Music...

As a music lover it's fun to try to figure out why one song, or any song is a hit. What makes it jump out at you. Guitar licks, a blazing piano, emotive lyrics or in the case of this article a key change.

"In fact, 23 percent of number one hits between 1958 and 1990 were in multiple keys."

"The act of shifting a song’s key up either a half step or a whole step (i.e. one or two notes on the keyboard) near the end of the song, was the most popular key change for decades. In fact, 52 percent of key changes found in number one hits between 1958 and 1990 employ this change."

"What’s odd is that after 1990, key changes are employed much less frequently, if at all, in number one hits."


An interesting article.....https://tedium.co/2022/11/09/the-dea...c-ff63e367b734
__________________
OlllllllO
Blansky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 05:14 AM   #2
OverGeared
"TRF" Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: USA
Posts: 115
I'm a bit tone deaf, so key changes aren't as apparent to me as they are for others, but I do share your interest in what makes popular music popular in the first place. For the last several years, I've been following Tom Breihan's "The Number Ones" column over at Stereogum, where he's tenaciously cataloging every song to ever hit #1 on Billboard's Hot 100 (aka, the "pop" chart.)

https://www.stereogum.com/category/the-number-ones/

He's into the early-mid 2000s right now, which is around where my interest in pop music began to wane, but the archives are chick full of terrific explorations on how musical tastes, experimentation (and fear of experimentation,) politics, and U. S. culture as a whole influenced what artists and songs were able to make it to the top, starting back in 1957.

Beware: you can lose entire afternoons reading these columns if you're not careful.
OverGeared is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 05:28 AM   #3
Blansky
2023 Pledge Member
 
Blansky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: swmnpoolsmovie*
Posts: 8,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by OverGeared View Post
I'm a bit tone deaf, so key changes aren't as apparent to me as they are for others, but I do share your interest in what makes popular music popular in the first place. For the last several years, I've been following Tom Breihan's "The Number Ones" column over at Stereogum, where he's tenaciously cataloging every song to ever hit #1 on Billboard's Hot 100 (aka, the "pop" chart.)

https://www.stereogum.com/category/the-number-ones/

He's into the early-mid 2000s right now, which is around where my interest in pop music began to wane, but the archives are chick full of terrific explorations on how musical tastes, experimentation (and fear of experimentation,) politics, and U. S. culture as a whole influenced what artists and songs were able to make it to the top, starting back in 1957.

Beware: you can lose entire afternoons reading these columns if you're not careful.
Thanks for the info.

I guess one sign of a key change near the end of a song is it's sort of sweet, and an...."ok guys ...big finish here".
__________________
OlllllllO
Blansky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 05:41 AM   #4
OverGeared
"TRF" Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: USA
Posts: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blansky View Post
Thanks for the info.

I guess one sign of a key change near the end of a song is it's sort of sweet, and an...."ok guys ...big finish here".
The one that always gets me is Belinda's "Heaven is a Place on Earth"
OverGeared is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 05:53 AM   #5
Blansky
2023 Pledge Member
 
Blansky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: swmnpoolsmovie*
Posts: 8,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by OverGeared View Post
The one that always gets me is Belinda's "Heaven is a Place on Earth"
Yup. Good example.
__________________
OlllllllO
Blansky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 06:12 AM   #6
dddrees
"TRF" Member
 
dddrees's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Real Name: Dan
Location: USA
Watch: This N That
Posts: 33,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by OverGeared View Post
I'm a bit tone deaf, so key changes aren't as apparent to me as they are for others, but I do share your interest in what makes popular music popular in the first place. For the last several years, I've been following Tom Breihan's "The Number Ones" column over at Stereogum, where he's tenaciously cataloging every song to ever hit #1 on Billboard's Hot 100 (aka, the "pop" chart.)

https://www.stereogum.com/category/the-number-ones/

He's into the early-mid 2000s right now, which is around where my interest in pop music began to wane, but the archives are chick full of terrific explorations on how musical tastes, experimentation (and fear of experimentation,) politics, and U. S. culture as a whole influenced what artists and songs were able to make it to the top, starting back in 1957.

Beware: you can lose entire afternoons reading these columns if you're not careful.
Thanks for sharing
__________________
When it captures your imagination, that's when you know you have found your passion.

Loyal Foot Soldier of The Nylon Nation.

Card Carrying Member of the Global Association of
Retro-Grouch-Curmudgeons
dddrees is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 06:58 AM   #7
-dustin
2023 Pledge Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Real Name: Dustin
Location: A, TX
Posts: 1,315
Pretty interesting.

Quote:
If I record a song in the key of C major into digital recording software, like Logic or ProTools, and then decide I don’t like that key, I don’t have to play it again in that new key. I can just use my software to shift it into that different key. I’m no longer constrained by my instrument.
I had no idea software was that advanced. But my copy of Finale is also like 13yrs old.

Now I'm gonna go find Sicko Mode, because I'm rather intrigued and want to hear a key change in this genre.
-dustin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 09:15 AM   #8
Mifune
"TRF" Member
 
Mifune's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: here AND there...
Posts: 1,937
I listen to Micro tonal... so there are MUCH MORE than whole and Half steps.

this is a GREAT TED TALK on the repeatability of modern music versus classic songs from days of yore.

you have to watch the entire video because he wraps it up neatly in the end.

Mifune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 10:13 AM   #9
White Collar Boy
"TRF" Member
 
White Collar Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Real Name: Matt
Location: Australia
Watch: PAM111
Posts: 1,800
I think they are only ‘heavy handed’ when anything of the chorus is too much. Here are a few of my favourites:

‘Heaven Is A Place On Earth’ — Belinda Carlisle
‘I Wanna Be Sedated’ — The Ramones
‘Our House’ — Madness
‘Penny Lane’ — The Beatles.
White Collar Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 10:56 AM   #10
enjoythemusic
2023 Pledge Member
 
enjoythemusic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Real Name: Steven
Location: Glocal
Posts: 15,636
Interesting. Key changes are one of the reasons I've been asking electronic drum manufacturers to offer global set change to account for key changes.

When it comes to time signature changes....

__________________
“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming 'Wow! What a Ride!'” -- Hunter S. Thompson

Sent from my Etch A Sketch using String Theory.

Enjoy Your Time,

-- Steven
enjoythemusic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 12:53 PM   #11
Tricolore66
"TRF" Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 931
Interesting article, and something I've noticed on a lot of classics and great pop songs. It seems like something that works best with a big chorus and harmonies. Don't tell anybody, but I f-ing love the Bee Gees! They do this quite a bit, and this song is a good example, as well as being a very underrated pop song.


https://youtu.be/mJule_2mx3I
Tricolore66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 01:57 PM   #12
Dan Pierce
2023 Pledge Member
 
Dan Pierce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Real Name: D'OH!
Location: Kentucky
Watch: Rolex-1 Tudor-3
Posts: 34,506
Music will always be lead by the heart, not statistics.

Having said that, as the fly said as he walking over the mirror, "that's one way of looking at it."
dP
__________________
TRF Member# 1668
Bass Player in TRF "AFTER DARK" Bar & NightClub Band
Commander-in-Chief of The Nylon Nation
The Crown & Shield Club
Honorary Member of P-Club
Dan Pierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1 December 2022, 03:46 PM   #13
Tricolore66
"TRF" Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: USA
Posts: 931
I was banging around on the guitar tonight while flipping through my music collection on my music server, thinking of some stuff to play with some buddies. I came across "Wishing Well" by Free, which is such a great classic rock song. Big riff and just awesome Paul Rodgers vocals (maybe the best voice in all of rock music). Sure enough, key change in the last chorus!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2Bw_HH_T4g
Tricolore66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3 December 2022, 06:50 AM   #14
zengineer
"TRF" Member
 
zengineer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,989
Putting the man himself aside, I always thought Michael Jackson, Man in the Mirror was a masterpiece of key changes tied into the lyrics.

Sent using Tapatalk
zengineer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 December 2022, 06:28 AM   #15
Mifune
"TRF" Member
 
Mifune's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: here AND there...
Posts: 1,937
Genesis has always been a master of key changes.
Mifune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4 December 2022, 09:45 AM   #16
White Collar Boy
"TRF" Member
 
White Collar Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Real Name: Matt
Location: Australia
Watch: PAM111
Posts: 1,800
Quote:
Originally Posted by zengineer View Post
Putting the man himself aside, I always thought Michael Jackson, Man in the Mirror was a masterpiece of key changes tied into the lyrics.
The Magic of Michael. Heard today, is the album Bad good? As a kid, I was very into it, and can remember buying MJ merch in the local, suburban grocery store: some cards with gum. But I’m not sure I like any of it now, apart from maybe ‘Smooth Criminal’, which in hindsight maybe he was… I still play Off The Wall and, even better, Thriller.

I would love to read a Patrick Bateman-style analysis of ‘Man In The Mirror’. “His early work was a little too disco for my taste, but I think ‘Man In The Mirror’ is Jackson’s undisputed masterpiece. A song so catchy that its simple but important message, that personal responsibility is foundational to any meaningful social change, was lost on many fans. But they should listen. Because that message is as relevant today as in 1988… Hey Paul!”
White Collar Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

DavidSW Watches


*Banners Of The Month*
This space is provided to horological resources.





Copyright ©2004-2023, The Rolex Forums. All Rights Reserved.

ROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEXROLEX

Rolex is a registered trademark of ROLEX USA. The Rolex Forums is not affiliated with ROLEX USA in any way.