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Old 10 July 2020, 10:38 PM   #1
dricig
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Winder magnitizes my watch.

Just wondering if anyone has ever heard of a watch winder magnetizing a watch.
My 16750 always runs great at +3 sec/day. I noticed last month that it was gaining 15 sec/day so I demagnetized it and it returned to +3.
After some experimenting I found that after a day on my winder the watch gets magnetized again and a demagnetizing returns it to normal.
Of course I am going to dump this winder (Its an inexpensive AC single winder I received as a gift) but I was just curious as to anyone hearing of this before.

thanks
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Old 10 July 2020, 10:42 PM   #2
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Is is due to the magnets in motors?

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Old 10 July 2020, 10:44 PM   #3
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It kind of makes sense, since a winder works on a motor, which is nothing but an electrical coil that works based on the principles of magnetization. As I understand it.

My last winder was an Orbita, which is the only one that I know of made in the USA (in my state, actually) and it uses a different and unique method that causes the motor to run for only a few seconds every minute or so.
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Old 10 July 2020, 11:01 PM   #4
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It kind of makes sense, since a winder works on a motor, which is nothing but an electrical coil that works based on the principles of magnetization. As I understand it.

My last winder was an Orbita, which is the only one that I know of made in the USA (in my state, actually) and it uses a different and unique method that causes the motor to run for only a few seconds every minute or so.
But the magnets in motors always there
I better think twice to use my winders again!

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Old 10 July 2020, 11:14 PM   #5
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Frankly using a winder for a relatively simple movement such as yours is more hassle than what it's worth. Well maybe not for you but personally unless I had a relatively difficult watch to set I wouldn't bother with a winder other than my own wrist and this was true even when I had over ten watches that I rotated. All were just way to easy to set and wind depending on which I chose to wear.
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Old 10 July 2020, 11:19 PM   #6
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Frankly using a winder for a relatively simple movement such as yours is more hassle than what it's worth. Well maybe not for you but personally unless I had a relatively difficult watch to set I wouldn't bother with a winder other than my own wrist and this was true even when I had over ten watches that I rotated. All were just way to easy to set and wind depending on which I chose to wear.
I second this....not to mention wear and tear to the parts!

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Old 10 July 2020, 11:24 PM   #7
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I second this....not to mention wear and tear to the parts!

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I thought about mentioning this and didn't, thanks for pointing this out.

Some may think it's a pain, but I don't see it being the end of the world or that big of a chore to me. I actually have to tie my tie and my shoe laces before going out also but yet to find a tool that does this for me automatically and yet I still manage to make it out of my house and with my pants and shirt on.
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Old 10 July 2020, 11:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post
Frankly using a winder for a relatively simple movement such as yours is more hassle than what it's worth. Well maybe not for you but personally unless I had a relatively difficult watch to set I wouldn't bother with a winder other than my own wrist and this was true even when I had over ten watches that I rotated. All were just way to easy to set and wind depending on which I chose to wear.
Quote:
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I second this....not to mention wear and tear to the parts!

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post
I thought about mentioning this and didn't, thanks for pointing this out.

Some may think it's a pain, but I don't see it being the end of the world or that big of a chore to me. I actually have to tie my tie and my shoe laces before going out also but yet to find a tool that does this for me automatically and yet I still manage to make it out of my house and with my pants and shirt on.
Thanks for these observations on the legitimacy of winder usage, but they are not relevant to my original post. I'm interested if anyone has ever experienced the problem.
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Old 10 July 2020, 11:53 PM   #10
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Excellent Info!

Thank you
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Old 11 July 2020, 03:21 AM   #11
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Thanks for these observations on the legitimacy of winder usage, but they are not relevant to my original post. I'm interested if anyone has ever experienced the problem.
Sure it is.

If you don't use one, you wouldn't have these issues in the first place.


The feedback one gets can sometimes be relevant, just not the answer your wanting to hear. Ask a group anything and your bound to get something you don't like to hear even if it's true.

Good thing is you can still pick and chose which advice you take.
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Old 11 July 2020, 03:32 AM   #12
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Motors create a magnetic field. It is the magnetic field that can magnetize small metal parts, so good winders will have their motors shielded.

You don't want to place your watch next to older electric analog clocks, or large magnetic fields that speakers generate, either.
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Old 11 July 2020, 04:37 AM   #13
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Motors create a magnetic field. It is the magnetic field that can magnetize small metal parts, so good winders will have their motors shielded.

You don't want to place your watch next to older electric analog clocks, or large magnetic fields that speakers generate, either.
I never thought of the clock reference but you are 100% correct. My hobby is restoring antique electric clocks and I keep my Rolex in the same cabinet. What would your advice be to a safe distance? A foot? Two? More?
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Old 11 July 2020, 03:08 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dricig View Post
Thanks for these observations on the legitimacy of winder usage, but they are not relevant to my original post. I'm interested if anyone has ever experienced the problem.
Don't worry about it OP, the anti-winder folks come out every time a winder post is created.

Thanks for posting this I did not know a winder could possible magnetize. I too was given one as a gift and thought about using it someday. Something to think about.
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Old 12 July 2020, 03:50 AM   #15
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I never thought of the clock reference but you are 100% correct. My hobby is restoring antique electric clocks and I keep my Rolex in the same cabinet. What would your advice be to a safe distance? A foot? Two? More?
The magnetic field of your clock motors can be measured, or visually seen with a small hand compass.

I wouldn't expect there to be much influence even a few inches away, and a foot seems to be plenty unless the motor is very powerful when on.

You can shield your watches from your clocks with a ferrous plate between them, to redirect the magnetic field influence.
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Old 12 July 2020, 04:14 AM   #16
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Another reason not to use a winder. Winders are newbie ideas no?
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Old 12 July 2020, 04:43 AM   #17
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The magnetic field of your clock motors can be measured, or visually seen with a small hand compass.

I wouldn't expect there to be much influence even a few inches away, and a foot seems to be plenty unless the motor is very powerful when on.

You can shield your watches from your clocks with a ferrous plate between them, to redirect the magnetic field influence.
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Old 12 July 2020, 04:58 AM   #18
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We have heard this complaint before. Must be a cheap winder.
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Old 12 July 2020, 10:04 AM   #19
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I have used a "cheap winder" for 7 years and it does not 'magnetise' the watches.
Mine have been serviced by the RSC, come back doing a consistent 3 - 5 secs/day (3 for one , 5 for the other) and that does not change until they are serviced again. I check both watches that are on the winder every day and have been logging their variation for several years. The "wear" thing is not an issue IMHO as common sense tells you that winding them all the time creates "wear" of a different type anyhow. Take your pick.
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Old 27 July 2020, 09:52 PM   #20
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We have heard this complaint before. Must be a cheap winder.
It was cheap, Sharper Image brand
I guess you get what you pay for.

Thanks for all the comments/opinions. No more winders for me.
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Old 27 July 2020, 11:23 PM   #21
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It was cheap, Sharper Image brand
I guess you get what you pay for.

Thanks for all the comments/opinions. No more winders for me.
For me personally I like hearing both Pros and Cons on most things. Generally this is the best way one can arrive at the solution that best works for you. I've often said I'm looking for the best answer not just any old answer. Details matter just as much as perspective sometimes. It's just sometimes the Cons can be a bit harder to hear.
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Old 28 July 2020, 12:36 AM   #22
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I never had an issue with my winder and had it since 2010. I find my watches get magnetized when reaching into the refrigerator reaching for the milk or other items. My hand goes right by the left door magnet strip.
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Old 28 July 2020, 03:37 AM   #23
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For what it’s worth, I use a Wolf winder, arguably the best on the market; never had any issues.
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