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Old 13 January 2010, 01:53 PM   #1
Coroner
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Bracelet stretch

If I leave my sub on while lifting weights, how much stress and stretch will be placed on the bracelet? Could I potentially break a pin? I really push myself in the gym and do a variety of exercises, so I'm concerned that I'll eventually break the bracelet.

I would hate to lose my watch because of a compromised bracelet.

Thanks for any input.
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Old 13 January 2010, 01:57 PM   #2
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I would think your sub can take it. I wear my watches working out for some time now with no problems?

As for wear or what some say is stretch. This is mostly caused by dirt so keep watch clean and you will reduce wear and tear over time.
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Old 13 January 2010, 01:59 PM   #3
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There's that "S" word again...it's been cropping up a lot again recently......

I am a structural designer working with steel design day in day out for the last 30 years.....

You will NEVER EVER manage to stretch a stainless steel Rolex watch bracelet with loadings from your body alone, you could almost hang a car from a Rolex watch bracelet and it would not stretch.

There is NO STRETCH associated with Rolex watch bracelets.....it is ELONGATION DUE TO WEAR.......this is caused when grit/grime/dust etc get in between the links of the bracelet and as the bracelet flexes during nornal wear the grit/grime/dust act as cutting compounds and wear the pins and the links themselves resulting in a looser fit.....
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Old 13 January 2010, 02:19 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Colnago View Post
There's that "S" word again...it's been cropping up a lot again recently......

I am a structural designer working with steel design day in day out for the last 30 years.....

You will NEVER EVER manage to stretch a stainless steel Rolex watch bracelet with loadings from your body alone, you could almost hang a car from a Rolex watch bracelet and it would not stretch.

There is NO STRETCH associated with Rolex watch bracelets.....it is ELONGATION DUE TO WEAR.......this is caused when grit/grime/dust etc get in between the links of the bracelet and as the bracelet flexes during nornal wear the grit/grime/dust act as cutting compounds and wear the pins and the links themselves resulting in a looser fit.....

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Old 13 January 2010, 02:42 PM   #5
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Thanks for the quick responses. My sub will be getting its exercise right along with me.
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Old 13 January 2010, 02:47 PM   #6
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If there's not a real "need" to wear it during your workout, leave it off. I would be more worried about "banging it up" than stretch on the bracelet. The watch in any event should survive...
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Old 13 January 2010, 04:16 PM   #7
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I concur with JimC. I don't wear my Rolex when working out with weights because I don't want to risk banging up the crystal or bracelet. The only exception is when I'm on the road, and go to a gym while traveling, because I'm more concerned about the risk of leaving my watch in a hotel room (even in a safe).
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Old 13 January 2010, 05:29 PM   #8
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For myself when I belonged to a gym, I always felt my watch was safer on my wrist than in my car on in a locker.
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Old 13 January 2010, 05:31 PM   #9
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For myself when I belonged to a gym, I always felt my watch was safer on my wrist than in my car on in a locker.
I agree. I would rather leave it at home, than take it part way.
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Old 14 January 2010, 01:00 AM   #10
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One drawback would be that unless you equalize the other wrist with the same weight as, say, a Sea dweller, you will get uneven development!
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Old 14 January 2010, 01:57 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colnago View Post
There's that "S" word again...it's been cropping up a lot again recently......

I am a structural designer working with steel design day in day out for the last 30 years.....

You will NEVER EVER manage to stretch a stainless steel Rolex watch bracelet with loadings from your body alone, you could almost hang a car from a Rolex watch bracelet and it would not stretch.

There is NO STRETCH associated with Rolex watch bracelets.....it is ELONGATION DUE TO WEAR.......this is caused when grit/grime/dust etc get in between the links of the bracelet and as the bracelet flexes during nornal wear the grit/grime/dust act as cutting compounds and wear the pins and the links themselves resulting in a looser fit.....
Have to agree with you 100% myself worked in the steel industry for almost 30 years S.Steel is one of the toughest materials on the planet.And the only time it will stretch when its heated to around 1300c,and the many posts about laying there watch on cloths.Just encase the wood table scratches there watch makes me smile.
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Old 14 January 2010, 02:22 AM   #12
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So whats the best way to prevent "elongation due to wear"? Frequent soap and warm water baths of the bracelet?

I guess the best way is to not wear it- so the second best way, then.
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Old 14 January 2010, 03:31 AM   #13
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So whats the best way to prevent "elongation due to wear"? Frequent soap and warm water baths of the bracelet?

I guess the best way is to not wear it- so the second best way, then.
Well put it this way been wearing a few now for well over 20 years and none have any major wear.And all I do is wash in plain water if used in salt water and keep them clean with just plain soap and water it works for me.
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Old 11 November 2010, 10:09 AM   #14
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I'm glad we have this myth cleared up...I know I will sleep better at night!!!
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Old 11 November 2010, 10:22 AM   #15
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The reason that I don't wear any of my Rolex watches when I lift weights has nothing to do with worrying about stretching them. I think it just feels terrible. Why would you want to have your Submariner on during a workout? I would just insure it and lock it in the trunk of your car before you head in.
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Old 11 November 2010, 11:05 AM   #16
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The reason that I don't wear any of my Rolex watches when I lift weights has nothing to do with worrying about stretching them. I think it just feels terrible. Why would you want to have your Submariner on during a workout? I would just insure it and lock it in the trunk of your car before you head in.
I think your Insurance could give you a hard time for leaving a Rolex in the trunk!
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Old 11 November 2010, 12:10 PM   #17
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I think your Insurance could give you a hard time for leaving a Rolex in the trunk!
The trunk is more secure than the passenger compartment on "most" cars.
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Old 11 November 2010, 02:10 PM   #18
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Perhaps my routine isn't hard enough but I have no problem wearing mine at the gym, it helps me measure time between sets, is more secure on my wrist than elsewhere, and goes in the shower with me after. As with most other issues though - to each his own. ;)
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Old 11 November 2010, 02:14 PM   #19
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I would be more concerned that if your watch is that tight while you work out, you are unnecessarily restricting blood flow...

It's kind of like wearing a tourniquet when you do not want any restriction...

In any event, it's likely safer on your wrist than it is in a locker.........
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Old 11 November 2010, 02:21 PM   #20
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I would be more concerned that if your watch is that tight while you work out, you are unnecessarily restricting blood flow...

It's kind of like wearing a tourniquet when you do not want any restriction...

In any event, it's likely safer on your wrist than it is in a locker.........
Ahh-the beauty of the glide lock- so easy to avoid the tourniquet effect!
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Old 11 November 2010, 04:14 PM   #21
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Have to agree with you 100% myself worked in the steel industry for almost 30 years S.Steel is one of the toughest materials on the planet.And the only time it will stretch when its heated to around 1300c,and the many posts about laying there watch on cloths.Just encase the wood table scratches there watch makes me smile.
Having a background in metallurgy I do agree. However metal will stretch without heat if pulled correctly. I work testing metals tensile strength for weld procedure specifications. A metals tensile strength is its ability to withstand load before changing its shape. At yield strength you can see the amount of stress in which plastic deformation is made noticeable. Or going from plastic to elastic. We pull samples in a testing machine equip with an exlensometer to measure Modulus of elasticity. These tests are covered under the requirements listed in ASME Sec. IX. You guys have about 20 years on me so I will step aside.

I would in away consider the possibility of a hammering effect to the pins of a loose bracelet. Cyclic actively from the watch being allowed to shift from the top of your arm to the bottom of your arm or “hammering” over an existence amount of time might show a notable amount of deformation to the pins. I wear the bracelet on my 16600 loose and one of the pins in the clasp is showing some bend. However it is 13 years old.
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Old 11 November 2010, 04:37 PM   #22
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I have witnessed (and taken part in) this type of test...during my days at college studying structural engineering....specifically the results are used to produce the (Young's Modulus) Stress/Strain graph.....

As for the hammering action, as you correctly described it as cyclic loading I have to question this hypotesis......the analogy I would make is that what you suggest is hitting a stainless steel ball (for instance) with a feather repeatedly for a long enough period will alter the shape of the ball......cyclic loading is not always compounded....i.e. it does not always build up....therefore cyclic loading of a magnitude below the limit of plastic distortion (not failure) will not cause a body of stainless steel to change shape....think of a the steel part of a car wheel.....it sees huge amounts of cyclic loading throughout its lifetime and it does not change shape.....but, if you look at cyclic loading from another standpoint for instance a hammer gently striking a polished stainless steel surface repetitively of course the polished surface will be replaced with an ever so slightly dented area where the hammer strikes......this is the effect on the pins of your bracelet, it has not bent....but nontheless become deformed from its original shape....the point is that this type of distortion of stainless steel can only happen if the elastic limit of the material is exceeded....where the hammer strikes is a stress concentration point due to the tiny contact area....the weight of the hammer over such a tiny area concentrates the stress to a point high enough to deform that tiny area......cyclic loading like this of course can be compounded.....resulting in what has happened to your bracelet......halting this cyclic loading by wearing the watch a bit tighter would prevent further deformation of the pin/bracelet.......does that all make sense?????....sorry for going on.....
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Old 11 November 2010, 06:22 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelby-villian View Post
So whats the best way to prevent "elongation due to wear"? Frequent soap and warm water baths of the bracelet?

I guess the best way is to not wear it- so the second best way, then.
Bracelet stretch is from grit that acts as polishing compound and wears the inside surface and pins.

Putting the bracelet in an ultrasonic cleaner every three to four months will prevent bracelet stretch. It cleans where toothpaste and and brush can't. You can remove a pin and see the black grit, reinsert and brush it up and down it will still be there. Try the same procedure and after a few cycles in the ultrasonic it will be clean. An decent enough ultrasonic cleaner can be had on eBay for under $50.
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Old 11 November 2010, 08:00 PM   #24
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I have witnessed (and taken part in) this type of test...during my days at college studying structural engineering....specifically the results are used to produce the (Young's Modulus) Stress/Strain graph.....

As for the hammering action, as you correctly described it as cyclic loading I have to question this hypotesis......the analogy I would make is that what you suggest is hitting a stainless steel ball (for instance) with a feather repeatedly for a long enough period will alter the shape of the ball......cyclic loading is not always compounded....i.e. it does not always build up....therefore cyclic loading of a magnitude below the limit of plastic distortion (not failure) will not cause a body of stainless steel to change shape....think of a the steel part of a car wheel.....it sees huge amounts of cyclic loading throughout its lifetime and it does not change shape.....but, if you look at cyclic loading from another standpoint for instance a hammer gently striking a polished stainless steel surface repetitively of course the polished surface will be replaced with an ever so slightly dented area where the hammer strikes......this is the effect on the pins of your bracelet, it has not bent....but nontheless become deformed from its original shape....the point is that this type of distortion of stainless steel can only happen if the elastic limit of the material is exceeded....where the hammer strikes is a stress concentration point due to the tiny contact area....the weight of the hammer over such a tiny area concentrates the stress to a point high enough to deform that tiny area......cyclic loading like this of course can be compounded.....resulting in what has happened to your bracelet......halting this cyclic loading by wearing the watch a bit tighter would prevent further deformation of the pin/bracelet.......does that all make sense?????....sorry for going on.....
Yes that makes good since! My reference comes from testing I performed working for Seimens. We designed testing equipment that would cyclically load parts from our turbine in a simulator. The simulator would replicate vibration and record the cycle’s parts would see prior to showing fatigue. Even within their range of elasticity the longer the parts stayed in the simulator the weaker they become over time. After various intervals of simulated testing we would perform a destructive test to see if the tensile and yield strength remained the same. About 30% of the parts would show failure sooner than the parts tested without undergoing ware simulation test.

Thank You for your response.

P.S. Are you sure your not my boss?? Brian??
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Old 11 November 2010, 08:12 PM   #25
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Yes that makes good since! My reference comes from testing I performed working for Seimens. We designed testing equipment that would cyclically load parts from our turbine in a simulator. The simulator would replicate vibration and record the cycle’s parts would see prior to showing fatigue. Even within their range of elasticity the longer the parts stayed in the simulator the weaker they become over time. After various intervals of simulated testing we would perform a destructive test to see if the tensile and yield strength remained the same. About 30% of the parts would show failure sooner than the parts tested without undergoing ware simulation test.

Thank You for your response.

P.S. Are you sure your not my boss?? Brian??
Yes it's Brian....your sacked!!!

Just kidding.....I would imagine that has something to do with work hardening caused by the cyclic loading, rather than "necking down" of the material..
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Old 12 November 2010, 02:48 AM   #26
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Yes it's Brian....your sacked!!!

Just kidding.....I would imagine that has something to do with work hardening caused by the cyclic loading, rather than "necking down" of the material..
Funny Brian!!!

Well that’s what started the pissing match. It was about 60/40 on the hardness over fatigue issue, 60 to part failure and 40 to hardness. Vickers Rockwell found a 20% to 30% increase in hardness so that was proven however the lab was standing on eliminating vibration. If they could sale this theory it would bring design changes, leading to new contracts ext.ext. The issue of parts becoming hard due to cyclic load only got a few contracts to make the parts out of a more suitable material. In all, a bigger picture was to sale a more expensive warranty to the customers, which in this case is power utilities. So the utilities way of thinking is “we have always used this product so let’s stay with it” and now you and I are in the picture. “Oh look honey the power bill went up $10". When I left Seimens we were still changing out parts and the issue really went nowhere.
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